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Thinking ahead to a Quiet January

Thinking ahead to a Quiet January

Nov 23 · 3 min read
January is an excellent time to get things done, especially if urgent tasks mean you never get enough clear time to work on your ‘someday / maybe’ list. The end of the calendar year coincides with the end of the business year for many organisations. Christmas holidays end and people go back to work in a period of relative calm in anticipation of the year ahead.
Another great feature of January: it’s a quiet time for you, but it’s also a quiet time for many of your colleagues. January is the ideal opportunity to run a small experiment or pilot project to try something new. The opportunity cost of a short January distraction is at its lowest, and you can harness the instinct to do something different in the coming year. If a January pilot project is successful, you could scale it in time for Spring.
If I can tempt you to do something different this January, there are one or two quick steps you might need to take in the next few weeks so you will be ready.

Think about signing up for a free trial to begin in January. Maybe get a couple of colleagues on board now – your subconscious minds can start processing ideas between now and January. If December looks like a crazy period, perhaps it’s an ideal time to observe the shortcomings in the current working patterns. Could you set aside a week in January where you avoid routine meetings or appointments that could wait, except for collaborating on your pilot project.

If you want to complete a pilot project in January, you will need to limit your focus to one deliverable, maybe two. Pick one thing that would prove the concept or sink it. The objective is to do just enough to give you the confidence to go ahead with some form of production rollout. The first production rollout doesn’t have to be big.

If you need help, ask.  In January, vendor consultants tend to have more capacity if you get stuck. New year resolutions are easier if you team up with others. Moreover, you don’t have to give up alcohol or count calories to get an exciting new venture underway.

Thinking ahead to a Quiet January

Nov 23 · 3 min read
January is an excellent time to get things done, especially if urgent tasks mean you never get enough clear time to work on your ‘someday / maybe’ list. The end of the calendar year coincides with the end of the business year for many organisations. Christmas holidays end and people go back to work in a period of relative calm in anticipation of the year ahead.
Another great feature of January: it’s a quiet time for you, but it’s also a quiet time for many of your colleagues. January is the ideal opportunity to run a small experiment or pilot project to try something new. The opportunity cost of a short January distraction is at its lowest, and you can harness the instinct to do something different in the coming year. If a January pilot project is successful, you could scale it in time for Spring.
If I can tempt you to do something different this January, there are one or two quick steps you might need to take in the next few weeks so you will be ready. Think about signing up for a free trial to begin in January. Maybe get a couple of colleagues on board now – your subconscious minds can start processing ideas between now and January. If December looks like a crazy period, perhaps it’s an ideal time to observe the shortcomings in the current working patterns. Could you set aside a week in January where you avoid routine meetings or appointments that could wait, except for collaborating on your pilot project.

If you want to complete a pilot project in January, you will need to limit your focus to one deliverable, maybe two. Pick one thing that would prove the concept or sink it. The objective is to do just enough to give you the confidence to go ahead with some form of production rollout. The first production rollout doesn’t have to be big.

If you need help, ask.  In January, vendor consultants tend to have more capacity if you get stuck.

New year resolutions are easier if you team up with others. Moreover, you don’t have to give up alcohol or count calories to get an exciting new venture underway.

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Free Webinar: Automation of Document-oriented Processes

Free Webinar: Automation of Document-oriented Processes

Wednesday, December 14th, 2022

10 AM EST, 3 PM GMT, and 4 PM CET

About the webinar

For our final webinar of 2022 we will dive into the automation of document-centered workflows.

Legito’s accomplished Senior Technical Consultant Paul Marlborough will show you how to increase your document lifecycle management efficiency, empowering you to work smarter and saving you valuable time in every step of the document lifecycle!

Here you will see examples of:

 

Workflows:

How they can be assigned to documents and objects to manage information

How automatic workflow transitions can be used to automate workflow

 

Objects:

Used in a case management scenario to link documents to a case/matter/obligation/job

Used to speed up drafting times of documents and increase accuracy

Used as a simple clause library instead of/ in addition to Legito’s advanced clause library and more

 

If you can’t make it you can still register! We’ll send you the recording to watch at your leisure!

Meet the speaker

Meet the speaker

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Webinar: What’s new in Legito Q4 | 2022

Webinar: What’s new in Legito | Q4 2022

Thank you to all who attended our recent webinar. For those unable to watch it live, here is the full webinar recording.

Legito had added more than 45 new features in the last few months. Watch the record of Mark Settle’s webinar to see what they can do for you. This webinar includes a demo of our new Clause Library feature.

 

Webinar: What’s new in Legito Q4 | 2022

Thank you to all who attended our recent webinar. For those unable to watch it live, here is the full webinar recording.

Legito had added more than 45 new features in the last few months. Watch the record of Mark Settle’s webinar to see what they can do for you. This webinar includes a demo of our new Clause Library feature

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The business case and ROI for Legito deployments

The business case and ROI for Legito deployments

About Charles Drayson

Charles is a UK lawyer who has used document automation for 20 years. He has worked for large law firms, corporate legal teams, and has automated legal and non-legal documents. He writes for Legito to share his passion for using automation to get work done. “I get a kick out of creating good content and seeing it used repeatedly and reliably by colleagues without fuss and bother”.

Charles Drayson

Nov 17 · 5 min read

A business case is not the same as a predicted return on investment (ROI), even if those terms seem to be used interchangeably. The objective is to demonstrate that a project is worth doing, perhaps to gain executive support, but perhaps to satisfy yourself before you put your reputation on the line. I suggest a business case is a reason to execute a project, and an ROI is an accounting device to project a financial advantage that includes figures for the costs and the rewards. It’s useful to consider both concepts, even if you are not asked for both. Otherwise, you might overlook some gems.

Long before Legito existed, I deployed a first-generation document automation solution for a sales team of 70+ people. I had a personal need to make the project work (I was struggling to do my job without something to bring order out of chaos), but I needed a more corporate motivation to win support for the project. Some projects will have a solid business case without a compelling ROI unless you take a wide interpretation of ‘return’ in an ROI calculation (a risky approach if your audience is cynical).

My first project appeared to be one of those. External events (think litigation, disgruntled shareholders, demanding audit conditions) transpired to deliver a clear imperative to deliver good governance of the sales / contracts /invoicing process. Cost savings, efficiencies, and cycle times were not on the list of objectives. Just fix a broken process.

Sometimes, the need to change is self-evident. Don’t let a request for an ROI obscure a manifest business need. Call the business case what it is.

 

My observation from supporting sales teams in the IT industry is that sponsors respond to an overwhelming business case even if they have asked for an ROI. Some bid teams try to express the business case using an ROI, and there’s no harm in that if the message isn’t lost in translation. Don’t let the numbers do a job that ought to be done by a clear statement of need. If one relies on an ROI as the principal expression of a business case, people try to assign numbers to some benefits that are tricky to express numerically with much precision or evidence. If that happens, cynics find it easy to pick a fight with the numbers, and the battle is lost.

 

Looking back on many projects related to document-orientated solutions, there was a business case that could be readily expressed with a few statements of need. Still, it was also possible to build a compelling ROI, even if some of the returns were incidental or perhaps unrelated to addressing the stated needs.

 

This is a particular problem for projects designed to promote governance and compliance. You could build an ROI calculation using numbers based on projected penalties from fines or litigation. However, many organisations have no direct experience of costly litigation or the heavy hand of regulatory fines, so the numbers might look too remote. The same difficulty applies to putting a number on lost business opportunities. In some industries, an organisation wouldn’t survive to recover from a governance or compliance failure. There’s no reliable data to put a figure on lost business. In those cases, speak truth unto power and be clear about the need. If the need isn’t sufficiently compelling, the project isn’t going to get support regardless of the ROI.

The project I described as a ‘just fix a broken process’ did deliver an impressive ROI, even if that was not our objective. If you can deliver ROI while meeting business needs, it will be easier to command support. Moreover, it could be the difference between getting mere approval for deployment and getting resources needed to increase the likelihood of success (for example, a budget to buy in some external consultancy assistance).

Before you build an ROI for Legito, take a free trial. A free trial is a great way to build confidence that you have selected the correct tool, but it is also an opportunity to experiment with a prototype solution to generate metrics for an ROI. The Legito consulting team sometimes gets involved in a trial project. Legito consultants can often build a rapid initial solution sufficient to prove capability as well as helping you to measure some initial results.

Legito projects often start with a document automation project (automatic production of tailored documents using variable data) to replace a legacy process of manual document creation. The time saved from manual document creation to automated drafting is easy to measure, and frequently reveals obvious savings with irrefutable evidence.

When measuring the benefits from Legito document automation, be sure to consider the cost of people checking for errors, fixing errors, and resolving formatting issues associated with legacy document drafting.

Here is a list of metrics you might consider measuring when building an ROI calculation:

Legito projects typically start small and expand after an initial quick deployment. It is usually possible to build a good ROI for a starter project – there’s no need to over-complicate the calculation by projecting results over a long IT project.

If you need help with an ROI, the Legito consultants have the experience to provide metrics from comparable projects. However, there’s nothing like a trial project to prove them for yourself.

Charles Drayson

Nov 17 · 5 min read

A business case is not the same as a predicted return on investment (ROI), even if those terms seem to be used interchangeably. The objective is to demonstrate that a project is worth doing, perhaps to gain executive support, but perhaps to satisfy yourself before you put your reputation on the line. I suggest a business case is a reason to execute a project, and an ROI is an accounting device to project a financial advantage that includes figures for the costs and the rewards. It’s useful to consider both concepts, even if you are not asked for both. Otherwise, you might overlook some gems. 

Long before Legito existed, I deployed a first-generation document automation solution for a sales team of 70+ people. I had a personal need to make the project work (I was struggling to do my job without something to bring order out of chaos), but I needed a more corporate motivation to win support for the project. Some projects will have a solid business case without a compelling ROI unless you take a wide interpretation of ‘return’ in an ROI calculation (a risky approach if your audience is cynical).

My first project appeared to be one of those. External events (think litigation, disgruntled shareholders, demanding audit conditions) transpired to deliver a clear imperative to deliver good governance of the sales / contracts /invoicing process. Cost savings, efficiencies, and cycle times were not on the list of objectives. Just fix a broken process.

Sometimes, the need to change is self-evident. Don’t let a request for an ROI obscure a manifest business need. Call the business case what it is.

 

My observation from supporting sales teams in the IT industry is that sponsors respond to an overwhelming business case even if they have asked for an ROI. Some bid teams try to express the business case using an ROI, and there’s no harm in that if the message isn’t lost in translation. Don’t let the numbers do a job that ought to be done by a clear statement of need. If one relies on an ROI as the principal expression of a business case, people try to assign numbers to some benefits that are tricky to express numerically with much precision or evidence. If that happens, cynics find it easy to pick a fight with the numbers, and the battle is lost.

This is a particular problem for projects designed to promote governance and compliance. You could build an ROI calculation using numbers based on projected penalties from fines or litigation. However, many organisations have no direct experience of costly litigation or the heavy hand of regulatory fines, so the numbers might look too remote. The same difficulty applies to putting a number on lost business opportunities. In some industries, an organisation wouldn’t survive to recover from a governance or compliance failure. There’s no reliable data to put a figure on lost business. In those cases, speak truth unto power and be clear about the need. If the need isn’t sufficiently compelling, the project isn’t going to get support regardless of the ROI.

 

Looking back on many projects related to document-orientated solutions, there was a business case that could be readily expressed with a few statements of need. Still, it was also possible to build a compelling ROI, even if some of the returns were incidental or perhaps unrelated to addressing the stated needs.

 

The project I described as a ‘just fix a broken process’ did deliver an impressive ROI, even if that was not our objective. If you can deliver ROI while meeting business needs, it will be easier to command support. Moreover, it could be the difference between getting mere approval for deployment and getting resources needed to increase the likelihood of success (for example, a budget to buy in some external consultancy assistance).

Before you build an ROI for Legito, take a free trial. A free trial is a great way to build confidence that you have selected the correct tool, but it is also an opportunity to experiment with a prototype solution to generate metrics for an ROI. The Legito consulting team sometimes gets involved in a trial project. Legito consultants can often build a rapid initial solution sufficient to prove capability as well as helping you to measure some initial results. Legito projects often start with a document automation project (automatic production of tailored documents using variable data) to replace a legacy process of manual document creation. The time saved from manual document creation to automated drafting is easy to measure, and frequently reveals obvious savings with irrefutable evidence.

When measuring the benefits from Legito document automation, be sure to consider the cost of people checking for errors, fixing errors, and resolving formatting issues associated with legacy document drafting.

Here is a list of metrics you might consider measuring when building an ROI calculation:

Legito projects typically start small and expand after an initial quick deployment. It is usually possible to build a good ROI for a starter project – there’s no need to over-complicate the calculation by projecting results over a long IT project.

If you need help with an ROI, the Legito consultants have the experience to provide metrics from comparable projects. However, there’s nothing like a trial project to prove them for yourself.

The business case and ROI for Legito deployments

Charles Drayson

Nov 17 · 5 min read

A business case is not the same as a predicted return on investment (ROI), even if those terms seem to be used interchangeably. The objective is to demonstrate that a project is worth doing, perhaps to gain executive support, but perhaps to satisfy yourself before you put your reputation on the line. I suggest a business case is a reason to execute a project, and an ROI is an accounting device to project a financial advantage that includes figures for the costs and the rewards. It’s useful to consider both concepts, even if you are not asked for both. Otherwise, you might overlook some gems. 

Long before Legito existed, I deployed a first-generation document automation solution for a sales team of 70+ people. I had a personal need to make the project work (I was struggling to do my job without something to bring order out of chaos), but I needed a more corporate motivation to win support for the project. Some projects will have a solid business case without a compelling ROI unless you take a wide interpretation of ‘return’ in an ROI calculation (a risky approach if your audience is cynical).

My first project appeared to be one of those. External events (think litigation, disgruntled shareholders, demanding audit conditions) transpired to deliver a clear imperative to deliver good governance of the sales / contracts /invoicing process. Cost savings, efficiencies, and cycle times were not on the list of objectives. Just fix a broken process.

Sometimes, the need to change is self-evident. Don’t let a request for an ROI obscure a manifest business need. Call the business case what it is.

 

My observation from supporting sales teams in the IT industry is that sponsors respond to an overwhelming business case even if they have asked for an ROI. Some bid teams try to express the business case using an ROI, and there’s no harm in that if the message isn’t lost in translation. Don’t let the numbers do a job that ought to be done by a clear statement of need. If one relies on an ROI as the principal expression of a business case, people try to assign numbers to some benefits that are tricky to express numerically with much precision or evidence. If that happens, cynics find it easy to pick a fight with the numbers, and the battle is lost.

This is a particular problem for projects designed to promote governance and compliance. You could build an ROI calculation using numbers based on projected penalties from fines or litigation. However, many organisations have no direct experience of costly litigation or the heavy hand of regulatory fines, so the numbers might look too remote. The same difficulty applies to putting a number on lost business opportunities. In some industries, an organisation wouldn’t survive to recover from a governance or compliance failure. There’s no reliable data to put a figure on lost business. In those cases, speak truth unto power and be clear about the need. If the need isn’t sufficiently compelling, the project isn’t going to get support regardless of the ROI.

 

Looking back on many projects related to document-orientated solutions, there was a business case that could be readily expressed with a few statements of need. Still, it was also possible to build a compelling ROI, even if some of the returns were incidental or perhaps unrelated to addressing the stated needs.

 

The project I described as a ‘just fix a broken process’ did deliver an impressive ROI, even if that was not our objective. If you can deliver ROI while meeting business needs, it will be easier to command support. Moreover, it could be the difference between getting mere approval for deployment and getting resources needed to increase the likelihood of success (for example, a budget to buy in some external consultancy assistance).

Before you build an ROI for Legito, take a free trial. A free trial is a great way to build confidence that you have selected the correct tool, but it is also an opportunity to experiment with a prototype solution to generate metrics for an ROI. The Legito consulting team sometimes gets involved in a trial project. Legito consultants can often build a rapid initial solution sufficient to prove capability as well as helping you to measure some initial results. Legito projects often start with a document automation project (automatic production of tailored documents using variable data) to replace a legacy process of manual document creation. The time saved from manual document creation to automated drafting is easy to measure, and frequently reveals obvious savings with irrefutable evidence.

When measuring the benefits from Legito document automation, be sure to consider the cost of people checking for errors, fixing errors, and resolving formatting issues associated with legacy document drafting.

Here is a list of metrics you might consider measuring when building an ROI calculation:

Legito projects typically start small and expand after an initial quick deployment. It is usually possible to build a good ROI for a starter project – there’s no need to over-complicate the calculation by projecting results over a long IT project.

If you need help with an ROI, the Legito consultants have the experience to provide metrics from comparable projects. However, there’s nothing like a trial project to prove them for yourself.

About Charles Drayson

Charles is a UK lawyer who has used document automation for 20 years. He has worked for large law firms, corporate legal teams, and has automated legal and non-legal documents. He writes for Legito to share his passion for using automation to get work done. “I get a kick out of creating good content and seeing it used repeatedly and reliably by colleagues without fuss and bother”.

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Citizen developer explained

Citizen developer explained

Nov 10 · 3 min read

Gartner says “A citizen developer is an employee who creates application capabilities for consumption by themselves or others, using tools that are not actively forbidden by IT or business units. A citizen developer is a persona, not a title or targeted role. They report to
a business unit or function other than IT
1. More people can be citizen developers if they use no code platforms like Legito.

Using citizen developers, you can quickly identify and make improvements to a business solution. Citizen developers are also users. They will be among the first to see an opportunity to make useful changes or small tweaks to alleviate glitches. Citizen developers want the solution to be the best it can be. They know the changes that are needed to keep track of business developments. You don’t have to wait to requisition a developer from the IT team or an external supplier, and you don’t need to explain the required changes.

Citizen developers will be part of the business team they serve. Colleagues know who they are. If colleagues see something they would like to add or change, they don’t need to hunt around the organisation for someone to lobby, and they don’t need to explain the needs in emails. Colleagues can walk across the office or have a Teams call to talk to a citizen developer in terms they both understand. Water cooler meetings can become a trigger for improvements. Change happens quickly. Citizen developers don’t need lengthy solution specifications.

Some back office work is routine and risks going unnoticed until it goes wrong. Back office professionals want and need their work to run like clockwork, and to serve the organisation in the most supportive way possible. There’s a big difference between ‘just good enough’ and ‘exactly what we need’. The latter requires the knowledge of an insider and an appreciation of the nuances and exceptions that accompany all back office work. You just don’t get that level of intuition if you rely on traditional developers

Not everyone is suited to be a citizen developers. That’s OK – you need one or two people who have a creative spirit and a spark to make things better, and the confidence to dig a bit deeper within a software solution. Building solutions with Legito is a way to acquire a new skill that gets noticed by their colleagues and management. It’s an opportunity that is not confined to any management level.

The next level beyond office applications

Nov 10 · 3 min read

Gartner says “A citizen developer is an employee who creates application capabilities for consumption by themselves or others, using tools that are not actively forbidden by IT or business units. A citizen developer is a persona, not a title or targeted role. They report to a business unit or function other than IT1. More people can be citizen developers if they use no code platforms like Legito.

Using citizen developers, you can quickly identify and make improvements to a business solution. Citizen developers are also users. They will be among the first to see an opportunity to make useful changes or small tweaks to alleviate glitches. Citizen developers want the solution to be the best it can be. They know the changes that are needed to keep track of business developments. You don’t have to wait to requisition a developer from the IT team or an external supplier, and you don’t need to explain the required changes

Citizen developers will be part of the business team they serve. Colleagues know who they are. If colleagues see something they would like to add or change, they don’t need to hunt around the organisation for someone to lobby, and they don’t need to explain the needs in emails. Colleagues can walk across the office or have a Teams call to talk to a citizen developer in terms they both understand. Water cooler meetings can become a trigger for improvements. Change happens quickly. Citizen developers don’t need lengthy solution specifications..

Some back office work is routine and risks going unnoticed until it goes wrong. Back office professionals want and need their work to run like clockwork, and to serve the organisation in the most supportive way possible. There’s a big difference between ‘just good enough’ and ‘exactly what we need’. The latter requires the knowledge of an insider and an appreciation of the nuances and exceptions that accompany all back office work. You just don’t get that level of intuition if you rely on traditional developers.

Not everyone is suited to be a citizen developer. That’s OK – you need one or two people who have a creative spirit and a spark to make things better, and the confidence to dig a bit deeper within a software solution. Building solutions with Legito is a way to acquire a new skill that gets noticed by their colleagues and management. It’s an opportunity that is not confined to any management level.

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