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Implementing Legito

Who to pick / Who to avoid

May 25 · 2 min read

As a cloud-based solution with a no-code toolset, Legito implementations don’t need a big IT project. One person can get started without much fuss. That said, many organisations will have an implementation project. There’s more to do than configure the solution. Even with a quick-start project, you need to decide where to start, and you will probably take time to scrutinise the current business process and associated documents.

Someone should also think about how to launch the solution in a way most likely to win hearts and minds. If you’re using Legito consultants to get you started, someone needs to steer their work.

You need the right person to make your implementation successful.

 

Here are some traits that make a good project representative:

 

#1 Comfortable with IT

Someone happy to pick up a new solution and play with it, knowing they won’t break it, and not afraid to experiment. We try to make Legito intuitive, but we also need to include options to configure the solution to make it fit your needs. Options need decisions, and it’s hard to make decisions if you’re not confident. The ideal person is likely to be a self-starter, happy to try new software without waiting for ‘the training’. We provide training, but it’s a framework rather than prescriptive step-by-step instructions.

 

#2 Document savvy

Organisations buy Legito because they have business processes orientated around documents. It’s best not to automate scrappy documents. We’ve written before about getting your documents in shape before you automate them. We like to see projects supported by someone who understands how Word works – they know that any new solution will need some housekeeping on legacy documents.

 

#3 Vision of change

Pick someone who can see a better way of getting work done, who believes that change will bring material benefits. This requires a willingness to look objectively at the ‘as-is’ situation and spot the opportunities to improve. 

 

#4 Holistic view of the organisation

Legito can deliver a positive ROI with one project, but it is designed to be an enterprise tool. We believe it should deliver benefits that work for the whole organisation, not just one team. Moreover, success with an initial project often requires support from senior leadership. The ability to view a solution from the widest perspective is more likely to deliver optimum outcomes.

 

#5 Capacity to get the project done

We know the decision to implement Legito is often driven by a pressing business need to solve a problem that risks becoming acute. It’s tempting to pick a project representative from within the affected team. An existing team member might well have the traits outlined above. But, the project will stall if it’s resourced by people who are too busy to give it regular attention.

My day job is negotiating contracts for the sale of software solutions (not Legito). I regularly see customers who are nervous about project delays. They assume delays will be caused by a vendor after the deal is done. In reality, most delays are caused by customers. Customer teams sometimes struggle to provide information, make decisions, provide feedback, and contribute to projects – because they are too busy with their business-as-usual tasks.

Implementing Legito

Who to pick / Who to avoid

May 25 · 2 min read

As a cloud-based solution with a no-code toolset, Legito implementations don’t need a big IT project. One person can get started without much fuss. That said, many organisations will have an implementation project. There’s more to do than configure the solution. Even with a quick-start project, you need to decide where to start, and you will probably take time to scrutinise the current business process and associated documents.

Someone should also think about how to launch the solution in a way most likely to win hearts and minds. If you’re using Legito consultants to get you started, someone needs to steer their work. 

You need the right person to make your implementation successful.

Here are some traits that make a good project representative:

 

#1 Comfortable with IT

Someone happy to pick up a new solution and play with it, knowing they won’t break it, and not afraid to experiment. We try to make Legito intuitive, but we also need to include options to configure the solution to make it fit your needs. Options need decisions, and it’s hard to make decisions if you’re not confident.

The ideal person is likely to be a self-starter, happy to try new software without waiting for ‘the training’. We provide training, but it’s a framework rather than prescriptive step-by-step instructions.

 

#2 Document savvy

Organisations buy Legito because they have business processes orientated around documents. It’s best not to automate scrappy documents. We’ve written before about getting your documents in shape before you automate them.

We like to see projects supported by someone who understands how Word works – they know that any new solution will need some housekeeping on legacy documents.

 

#3 Vision of change

Pick someone who can see a better way of getting work done, who believes that change will bring material benefits. This requires a willingness to look objectively at the ‘as-is’ situation and spot the opportunities to improve. 

 

#4 Holistic view of the organisation

Legito can deliver a positive ROI with one project, but it is designed to be an enterprise tool. We believe it should deliver benefits that work for the whole organisation, not just one team.

Moreover, success with an initial project often requires support from senior leadership. The ability to view a solution from the widest perspective is more likely to deliver optimum outcomes.

 

#5 Capacity to get the project done

We know the decision to implement Legito is often driven by a pressing business need to solve a problem that risks becoming acute. It’s tempting to pick a project representative from within the affected team. An existing team member might well have the traits outlined above. But, the project will stall if it’s resourced by people who are too busy to give it regular attention.

My day job is negotiating contracts for the sale of software solutions (not Legito). I regularly see customers who are nervous about project delays. They assume delays will be caused by a vendor after the deal is done. In reality, most delays are caused by customers.

Customer teams sometimes struggle to provide information, make decisions, provide feedback, and contribute to projects – because they are too busy with their business-as-usual tasks.

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