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Citizen developer explained

Citizen developer explained

Nov 10 · 3 min read

Gartner says “A citizen developer is an employee who creates application capabilities for consumption by themselves or others, using tools that are not actively forbidden by IT or business units. A citizen developer is a persona, not a title or targeted role. They report to
a business unit or function other than IT
1. More people can be citizen developers if they use no code platforms like Legito.

Using citizen developers, you can quickly identify and make improvements to a business solution. Citizen developers are also users. They will be among the first to see an opportunity to make useful changes or small tweaks to alleviate glitches. Citizen developers want the solution to be the best it can be. They know the changes that are needed to keep track of business developments. You don’t have to wait to requisition a developer from the IT team or an external supplier, and you don’t need to explain the required changes.

Citizen developers will be part of the business team they serve. Colleagues know who they are. If colleagues see something they would like to add or change, they don’t need to hunt around the organisation for someone to lobby, and they don’t need to explain the needs in emails. Colleagues can walk across the office or have a Teams call to talk to a citizen developer in terms they both understand. Water cooler meetings can become a trigger for improvements. Change happens quickly. Citizen developers don’t need lengthy solution specifications.

Some back office work is routine and risks going unnoticed until it goes wrong. Back office professionals want and need their work to run like clockwork, and to serve the organisation in the most supportive way possible. There’s a big difference between ‘just good enough’ and ‘exactly what we need’. The latter requires the knowledge of an insider and an appreciation of the nuances and exceptions that accompany all back office work. You just don’t get that level of intuition if you rely on traditional developers

Not everyone is suited to be a citizen developers. That’s OK – you need one or two people who have a creative spirit and a spark to make things better, and the confidence to dig a bit deeper within a software solution. Building solutions with Legito is a way to acquire a new skill that gets noticed by their colleagues and management. It’s an opportunity that is not confined to any management level.

The next level beyond office applications

Nov 10 · 3 min read

Gartner says “A citizen developer is an employee who creates application capabilities for consumption by themselves or others, using tools that are not actively forbidden by IT or business units. A citizen developer is a persona, not a title or targeted role. They report to a business unit or function other than IT1. More people can be citizen developers if they use no code platforms like Legito.

Using citizen developers, you can quickly identify and make improvements to a business solution. Citizen developers are also users. They will be among the first to see an opportunity to make useful changes or small tweaks to alleviate glitches. Citizen developers want the solution to be the best it can be. They know the changes that are needed to keep track of business developments. You don’t have to wait to requisition a developer from the IT team or an external supplier, and you don’t need to explain the required changes

Citizen developers will be part of the business team they serve. Colleagues know who they are. If colleagues see something they would like to add or change, they don’t need to hunt around the organisation for someone to lobby, and they don’t need to explain the needs in emails. Colleagues can walk across the office or have a Teams call to talk to a citizen developer in terms they both understand. Water cooler meetings can become a trigger for improvements. Change happens quickly. Citizen developers don’t need lengthy solution specifications..

Some back office work is routine and risks going unnoticed until it goes wrong. Back office professionals want and need their work to run like clockwork, and to serve the organisation in the most supportive way possible. There’s a big difference between ‘just good enough’ and ‘exactly what we need’. The latter requires the knowledge of an insider and an appreciation of the nuances and exceptions that accompany all back office work. You just don’t get that level of intuition if you rely on traditional developers.

Not everyone is suited to be a citizen developer. That’s OK – you need one or two people who have a creative spirit and a spark to make things better, and the confidence to dig a bit deeper within a software solution. Building solutions with Legito is a way to acquire a new skill that gets noticed by their colleagues and management. It’s an opportunity that is not confined to any management level.

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The next level beyond office applications

The next level beyond office applications

Oct 20 · 3 min read

It made perfect sense for Microsoft to adopt the ‘Office’ label when they started grouping their applications. Over time, we saw those applications having a similar look-and-feel and increasing connectivity. Office applications are used, err, right across the office. The Finance team uses the same solutions as the Marketing team, and the HR team, and every team. It would be annoying if they didn’t.

Each team might adopt its own templates, styles, macros and customisations to reflect the team’s needs and preferences. Still, they could share their work with other teams without hindrance. Most of the teams have a bias to some applications and probably don’t use the others. That’s fine – they all get value even if they don’t all use all of the solution all of the time. Some users get their work done with the basic features, and some users find value in complex, obscure features, and the real hero is one who builds clever stuff that colleagues can use.

We see Legito like that.

It’s fine if you just want to use it in one department, but our vision is about empowering the whole enterprise with features that work across team boundaries, with the same look-and-feel, integrated, and yet ready to be customised for the needs of each team. Most teams will only use some of the features, but the enterprise needs access to all of them. Legito gets work done within teams, but it exists because most work needs to flow between teams. It’s the next level beyond office applications. 

As organisations expand their use of Legito, we are seeing true enterprise-wide adoption. But, just like Microsoft Office, it’s equally useful for companies with few users. The numbers don’t matter – it’s the ability to span the whole organisation that makes it powerful.

Analysts and commentators are talking about no code applications and no code platforms. A few years ago, a phrase like ‘no code applications’ would seem ambiguous because it doesn’t describe anything specific. Today, it’s implicit that organisations increasingly want to build their own solutions using commercially available software. Moreover, they want to build those solutions without dependence on developers to create and maintain them. They want the building blocks to create, process, move, manage and share work – and they want them configured by colleagues with a native understanding of the business needs, and they want quick deployments – not IT projects. The users will be the same people who use office applications. Some of those will step up and create clever stuff for their colleagues.

Perhaps the test of an office application is whether an organisation would miss it if it wasn’t there, and where the adoption is self-evident of value.

The next level beyond office applications

Oct 20 · 3 min read

It made perfect sense for Microsoft to adopt the ‘Office’ label when they started grouping their applications. Over time, we saw those applications having a similar look-and-feel and increasing connectivity. Office applications are used, err, right across the office. The Finance team uses the same solutions as the Marketing team, and the HR team, and every team. It would be annoying if they didn’t.

Each team might adopt its own templates, styles, macros and customisations to reflect the team’s needs and preferences. Still, they could share their work with other teams without hindrance. Most of the teams have a bias to some applications and probably don’t use the others. That’s fine – they all get value even if they don’t all use all of the solution all of the time. Some users get their work done with the basic features, and some users find value in complex, obscure features, and the real hero is one who builds clever stuff that colleagues can use.

We see Legito like that.

It’s fine if you just want to use it in one department, but our vision is about empowering the whole enterprise with features that work across team boundaries, with the same look-and-feel, integrated, and yet ready to be customised for the needs of each team. Most teams will only use some of the features, but the enterprise needs access to all of them. Legito gets work done within teams, but it exists because most work needs to flow between teams. It’s the next level beyond office applications. 

As organisations expand their use of Legito, we are seeing true enterprise-wide adoption. But, just like Microsoft Office, it’s equally useful for companies with few users. The numbers don’t matter – it’s the ability to span the whole organisation that makes it powerful.

Analysts and commentators are talking about no code applications and no code platforms. A few years ago, a phrase like ‘no code applications’ would seem ambiguous because it doesn’t describe anything specific. Today, it’s implicit that organisations increasingly want to build their own solutions using commercially available software. Moreover, they want to build those solutions without dependence on developers to create and maintain them. They want the building blocks to create, process, move, manage and share work – and they want them configured by colleagues with a native understanding of the business needs, and they want quick deployments – not IT projects. The users will be the same people who use office applications. Some of those will step up and create clever stuff for their colleagues.

Perhaps the test of an office application is whether an organisation would miss it if it wasn’t there, and where the adoption is self-evident of value.

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